Results tagged ‘ Los Angeles Dodgers ’

Highlights: 5.13.13

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5.13.13 – Nationals 6, Dodgers 2

Stat of the Game: Jordan Zimmermann won his Major League leading seventh game of the season, allowing just two runs in 7.2 innings of work. 

Under-the-Radar Performance: Ryan Zimmerman plated three RBI, on a sac fly and a two-run double, to key the offense.

It Was Over When: Washington knocked out Los Angeles starter Josh Beckett after just three innings of work.

What to Watch for: 5.13.13

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Washington Nationals (20-17) vs. Los Angeles Dodgers (15-21)

RHP Jordan Zimmermann (6-1, 1.59) vs. RHP Josh Beckett (0-4, 5.13)

The Nationals open a three-game series and 10-game road trip with this evening’s tilt in Los Angeles. Washington sends six-game winner Jordan Zimmermann to the hill against a heretofore winless Josh Beckett in a matchup of right-handers.

NATIONALS LINEUP:

1. Span CF

2. Lombardozzi LF

3. Harper RF

4. Zimmerman 3B

5. LaRoche 1B

6. Desmond SS

7. Espinosa 2B

8. Suzuki C

9. Zimmermann RHP

CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’

The Nationals open a 10-game road trip to the Golden State’s cities of Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco. The 10-game trek, which matches the longest road swing on the 2013 schedule, marks Washington’s lone visit this season to the Pacific Coast and the first action against the NL West this year. The Nationals went 17-13 against the NL West last season (8-8 at NL West ballparks), the club’s first single-season winning mark against the division since ’05 (16-14).

GOING STREAKING

Adam LaRoche enters tonight’s action riding a nine-game hit streak, looking to join Ian Desmond (10 games, April 24-May 3) as the only Nationals to put together double-digit streaks this season. During the stretch, which began on May 2, LaRoche has gone 13-for-29 (.448) with six walks, two doubles, two RBI and five runs scored, posting a .528 OBP & 1.045 OPS. His hit streak began after batting just .129 (11-for-85) in his initial 25 games this season. LaRoche’s career-long hitting streak is 11 games, accomplished twice (last, July 22-August 3, 2012).

FIRST THINGS FIRST

Washington is 15-2 when scoring first this season, compared to 5-15 when its opponent gets on the board first. The Nationals have been outscored 21-15 in the first frame this season, but have outscored their opponents 21-9 in the second inning.

This Is Happening

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It’s only appropriate, on this last day of summer, that we can officially begin to discuss postseason baseball in Washington D.C. no longer as a “likelihood” or a “probability,” but as a reality. That’s the thing about the baseball season – a hot start is great, like the one the Nationals stormed out to by winning 10 of their first 14 games, but in the scope of a six-month marathon, it means very little. All the excitement of holding down first place is fantastic fun, but it does not mean anything until this time of year. There are no cheaply won postseason spots in our sport, and only sustained success over the duration of the spring and summer will lead to those meaningful games in October that Mike Rizzo, Davey Johnson and everyone around the organization have been talking about since Spring Training.

Yes, the National League East remains undecided, with a combination of eight Nationals wins and/or Braves losses still needed to determine the division crown. Beyond that lie the fight for home field advantage through the various rounds of the playoffs. These Nationals have taken nothing for granted so far this season, and you can be sure they won’t start now. Nevertheless, one indelible fact remains: there will be postseason baseball in our Nation’s Capital for the first time in 79 years.

Michael Morse celebrated as Ryan Zimmerman raced home on a wild pitch.

“What’s the big deal?” an exuberant Johnson jokingly questioned of the press corps, as fans watching his post-game press conference in the adjoining Lexus Presidents Club cheered his arrival.

The Nationals almost clinched their postseason spot Wednesday night in dramatic, surprising fashion, coming from nowhere to overcome a six-run, eighth-inning deficit, only to fall to the Dodgers, 7-6 in the ninth. While that would have been a game for the ages, long remembered by those who stuck it out to the end, it would have supported the script that is often preached, but not necessarily accurate, about this year’s Washington club, that all of this sudden success is a surprise. In actuality, it is the culmination of years of building the right way, from the ground up, and simply watching the pieces come together at the Major League level all at once. In a sense, it was much more fitting that the history was made thanks to a well-pitched, well-defended game, trademarks of a team that Washington fans have fallen in love with this season.

Drew Storen gave the game and the fans their endearing moment to cherish, as he faced the daunting middle of the Dodgers lineup – Matt Kemp, Adrian Gonzalez and Hanley Ramirez – holding a three-run lead in the ninth. The cushion would turn out to be more than enough. Storen painted a perfect, outside corner fastball to freeze Kemp, Wednesday night’s hero. He then handcuffed Gonzalez, the powerful lefty’s bat waving helplessly over a disappearing changeup. Finally, he blew away Nationals nemesis Hanley Ramirez – who owned a career .339 (147-for-433) mark with 27 home runs against the Nats coming into the at-bat – on a nasty slider to end it, pounding his mitt once and high-fiving catcher Kurt Suzuki in celebration.

Drew Storen struck out the side in the ninth to nail down the clinch.

“I didn’t even think about it until I saw it on the scoreboard afterwards,” said Storen of the clinching moment. “I was just having fun. The crowd was real into it. If you’re not out there having fun in that situation, you shouldn’t be out there.”

And though Storen provided the coup de gras, seemingly everyone chipped in. Ryan Zimmerman opened the scoring with a booming double to the left-center field gap, scoring Bryce Harper in the third inning. Danny Espinosa had an RBI-double of his own, and came in to score on a Suzuki sacrifice fly, the culmination of a hard-fought, professional at-bat. Ian Desmond and Jayson Werth each had a pair of hits, with the shortstop stealing one bag and the outfielder swiping a pair. As it has been all year with this team, you never know who the hero will be, and there were many of them Thursday night.

Ross Detwiler, meanwhile, continued to impress, and continued to show why this team has a real chance to make a deep October run. With six nearly flawless innings, in which a solo home run and a pair of singles were the only bumps in an otherwise smooth road to his career-best 10th victory, he quieted the powerful Dodgers lineup to put the Nationals in position to clinch.

Zimmerman and Werth celebrate the historic night.

“It was great seeing all of them on their feet,” the lanky lefty said of the crowd. “It really gives you the chills a bit to see how into it all of them were.”

Detwiler has consistently gone about his business, and though he is sometimes overshadowed by his teammates, there is no hiding his 6-3 record and 2.76 ERA in 13 starts since the All-Star break. He also became the fourth Nationals starter to hit double-digits in wins on Thursday, with Edwin Jackson sitting on nine victories heading into his start tonight against Milwaukee.

Speaking of those pesky Brewers, they are suddenly hot, and have clawed their way back into the race for the second National League Wild Card spot. In fact, the final four series on the Nationals schedule – Milwaukee, Philadelphia, St. Louis and Philadelphia again – all bring teams fighting for every game, their postseason lives at stake. Each game will be its own challenge, as the Nats try to wrap up the division. Those battles begin again tonight. But for today, at least, allow yourself to soak in the reality.

This is happening.

What to Watch For: 9/20

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Los Angeles Dodgers (77-72) vs. Washington Nationals (90-58)

LHP Chris Capuano (11-10, 3.60) vs. LHP Ross Detwiler (9-6, 3.16)

The Nationals and Dodgers split their doubleheader yesterday with the Nats snagging the opener, 3-1, but falling despite a big, late rally, 7-6 in the nightcap. Southpaws Ross Detwiler and Chris Capuano will decide the rubber match this evening as the Nationals need just one more win to clinch their first-ever postseason spot.

NATIONALS LINEUP

1. Werth RF

2. Harper CF

3. Zimmerman 3B

4. LaRoche 1B

5. Morse LF

6. Desmond SS

7. Espinosa 2B

8. Suzuki C

9. Detwiler LHP

FOLLOW THIS…

The Nationals are only the fifth team in modern MLB history (1901-present) to post three consecutive seasons winning 10 or more games than the year prior.

Note, however, that they are the first team in over 100 years to do so without the benefit of a deflated win total associated with a work stoppage. If you apply the Twins winning percentage in 1981 and the Marlins winning percentage in 1994 to a now-standard 162-game season, they would not come close to qualifying for this list.

TEAM                         1901             1902             1903             1904

Chicago Cubs            53-86            68-69            82-56            93-60

TEAM                              1906              1907             1908             1909

Boston Red Sox             49-105            59-90            75-79            88-63

TEAM                                 1981               1982              1983             1984

Minnesota Twins            41-68*            60-102            70-92            81-81

TEAM                             1994               1995             1996             1997

Florida Marlins            51-64*            67-76            80-82            92-70

TEAM                                           2009             2010             2011             2012

Washington Nationals            59-103            69-93            80-81            90-58**

*Season affected by work stoppage

**Season not complete

WE LOVE THE 90s

While the Nationals reached the 90-win plateau for the first time in 79 years on Wednesday, this is the ninth 90-win campaign recorded by a DC baseball team. From 1913-33, the AL Nationals posted eight separate 90-win seasons: 1933 (99 wins), 1925 (96), 1930 (94), 1932 (93), 1931 (92), 1924 (92), 1912 (91), 1913 (90), 2012 (90). This is the franchise’s fifth 90-win campaign: the Expos won 90+ in 1979 (95 victories), 1993 (94), 1987 (91) and 1980 (90).

FALL BALL

Coming off his last start on Friday in Atlanta, Ross Detwiler takes to the hill for the Nationals tonight. He went pitch-for-pitch with Kris Medlen, allowing one run on seven hits in 6.0 innings while walking one and fanning five batters along the way. “The National Det” is 5-3 with a 3.24 ERA in 13 career starts in September/October during career.

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What to Watch For: 9/19 – Game 2

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Los Angeles Dodgers (76-72) vs. Washington Nationals (90-57)

RHP Josh Beckett (6-13, 4.94) vs. LHP John Lannan (3-0, 2.41)

The Nationals took the opening game of the doubleheader, the series and the homestand with a 3-1 victory over the Dodgers earlier this afternoon. Washington reduced its NL East Magic Number to nine and its postseason Magic Number to one, and can earn a playoff berth with a win behind John Lannan in Game 2.

NATIONALS LINEUP

1. Werth RF

2. Harper CF

3. Zimmerman 3B

4. LaRoche 1B

5. Morse LF

6. Desmond SS

7. Lombardozzi 2B

8. Flores C

9. Lannan LHP

WHAT’S 79 YEARS BETWEEN FRIENDS?

With a Game 1 victory, The Nationals have become the first baseball team from the Nation’s Capital to reach the 90-win threshold since the 99-win ‘33 AL Nationals 79 years ago. Those ‘33 AL Nationals posted win No. 90 via a 7-3 home victory on September 10 vs. Cleveland.

LANNAN’S CANNON
Taking the ball in game two of today’s doubleheader, John Lannan looks to become the first Nationals pitcher ever to earn the win in each of his first four starts in a single season. In his last outing one week ago, he spun 5.2 scoreless innings, allowing five hits while striking out nine along the way in Washington’s 2-0 win over the Mets. While he has yet to face Los Angeles yet in 2012, Lannan is 4-1 with a 2.64 ERA (9 ER/30.2 IP) in five career starts versus the Dodgers.

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What to Watch For: 9/19 – Game 1

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Los Angeles Dodgers (76-71)Washington Nationals (89-57)

RHP Aaron Harang (9-9, 3.79) vs. RHP Jordan Zimmermann (10-8, 3.01)

The Nationals and Dodgers match up for a pair of games this afternoon and evening in D.C. to kick off Washington’s seven-game homestand. Right-handers Jordan Zimmermann and Aaron Harang match up in the opener.

NATIONALS LINEUP

1. Werth RF

2. Harper CF

3. Zimmerman 3B

4. LaRoche 1B

5. Morse LF

6. Desmond SS

7. Espinosa 2B

8. Suzuki C

9. Zimmermann RHP

MAGIC MOMENT

The Nationals currently sport a Magic Number of three in their pursuit of a D.C.’s first berth in MLB’s postseason since 1933. The Nationals/Expos franchise has only one post-season berth (1981: Expos lost to the Dodgers in a five-game NLCS) on its 44-year resume. Washington’s Magic Number to clinch the NL East is 10 games.

NATIONALS & DODGERS

Davey Johnson posted a 163-161 (.503) record in two seasons as Dodgers manager (1999-2000). Washington’s 7-2 series-opening win on July 22, 2011 marked Don Mattingly’s first career “game of record” as a player or manager against the Nationals/Expos franchise. Dodgers President and CEO Stan Kasten served as Nationals President for five seasons from 2006-10. Hall-of-Fame voice of the Dodgers, Vin Scully, began his broadcasting career at WTOP radio in D.C. shortly after graduating from Fordham University. October 19, 1981 is still to this day known as “Blue Monday” in Montreal, as Rick Monday’s ninth-inning solo home run off Steve Rogers gave the Dodgers a 2-1 win in Game 5 of the NLCS and halted the franchise’s lone post-season appearance.

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From the Desk of Mark Lerner: Welcome to The Show

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Hello again Nationals fans,

As everyone undoubtedly knows by now, tonight is a special night. Bryce Harper will be making his MLB debut as we continue our series at Chavez Ravine.

As I talked about in my last blog, Dodger Stadium is one of the iconic venues in all of sports, and it is fitting that a 19 year-old kid from Las Vegas will be making his much-anticipated big league entrance on this stage.

All eyes - and cameras - will be on number 34 in red at Dodger Stadium tonight.

As “Hollywood” as this script seems, this was not how it was supposed to happen. Sure, the scenic backdrop, the 50,000-plus fans and the A-list celebs will be fantastic for the history books, but Bryce is here tonight on someone else’s terms.

Unfortunately, Ryan Zimmerman’s shoulder soreness has prompted a DL stint. Thankfully, this won’t be a prolonged absence for Ryan, but it does leave an immediate void in Davey’s lineup.

So, Mike Rizzo and Davey Johnson talked. And they talked again. Ultimately, it was determined that they needed another left-handed bat in the lineup, and an outfielder if possible.

So, Mike went to chilly, Rochester, NY and watched Bryce play three games. He saw enough to know that this is what he had to do. He diverted from his plan. But how many of us see our best laid plans executed exactly as we scripted? Not nearly enough. That’s just reality.

So, when Mike called me yesterday with the news that he planned to recall Bryce on Saturday, I was taken aback. Like most, I did not see this happening so quickly.

Mike told me that Bryce was the best fit for what Davey needed, especially with Zimmerman and Michael Morse on the shelf.

He also told me that Bryce’s development plan is still not finished. There is a good chance that he’ll need more time, more reps and more at-bats at Triple-A. But that is a discussion for another day.

Bryce should not be seen as a panacea. He’s not our run-production savior. That would be unfair.

But Mike does think – and I agree – that Bryce can provide our roster a healthy jolt.

So, let’s see what he can do. Let’s dig deeper than his batting average, his power output and instead keep our eyes open for his total game – the base running, the defense, the throwing arm. Let’s resist the urge to make grand conclusions based on ridiculously small sample sizes.

But, at the same time, let’s have fun. On a personal level, I am thrilled that I am in Los Angeles and will be at Dodger Stadium tonight.

Tonight’s tilt is going to be memorable. But, so is Tuesday’s DC debut at Nationals Park against the Diamondbacks. And his first matchup next weekend against the Phillies.

It all starts for Bryce tonight, fittingly in Tinseltown.

The first page of what we believe will be a special Hollywood script.

Up goes the curtain: it’s time to enjoy the show.

From the Desk of Mark Lerner: Districtly Speaking

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Hello Nationals fans,

I figured it was a great time to check in.

Before jumping into our 14-4 start, I want to talk about the Capitals and how their playoff run created its own set of challenges for me personally. I am on the West Coast with the ballclub and Wednesday’s  first pitch came just one hour before the Caps faceoff in Boston. A dilemma for sure, but one that could be overcome by technology.

The Caps moments after their game seven, overtime win. (Washington Capitals/Getty Images)

I had a heck of a time shifting between the game in front of me and the Caps game, which I was watching (between pitches) on my iPad. But, as day gave way to night, all of my hard work was rewarded as both the Nationals and Caps won. Later, I noticed that the Wizards won their 5th straight game for the first time since 2007. What an evening for DC sports fans!

As everyone reading this knows, Game 7s are special no matter the sport. However, it seems as if Game 7s in hockey are almost holy in nature. The Caps play last night certainly matched the game’s stakes.

Intense, physical, smart and concerted is how I would describe last night’s effort in a season-saving, 2-1 victory in Boston. And really, it had to be that way in order to advance.

The Bruins were game. This was hardly the case of a satisfied defending champ going through the motions. My eyes told me that the Bruins played well in each game of the series. But our Caps won the closest playoff series in NHL history against the defending Stanley Cup champions because they played slightly better. One goal better, in fact.

I am so happy for my friend, Capitals Owner Ted Leonsis, General Manager George McPhee, head coach Dale Hunter and all of the players. I don’t think any DC sports fans will forget this series, Joel Ward’s goal or Braden Holtby’s playoff arrival.

Xavier Nady rounds third after his game-tying home run on April 13.

But now comes the hard part. Our Caps work is not done. We only know that they could play, under various scenarios, either the Rangers, Flyers or Devils in the second round. But before looking ahead, I hope for one night at least, the Caps enjoyed their spoils.

Back on the diamond, things are going well on all fronts, outside of the injury bug that has bitten our cleanup hitter (Morse), our closer (Storen), our most experienced starting pitcher (Wang) and now our best player (Zimmerman). Thankfully, we entered the season with depth all around the diamond. 162 games in six months is a grind and it is folly to believe that any club can go injury-free or even close to it.

But the bench has been up to the task. Through just 18 games, Chad Tracy (game-winning hits on Tuesday in San Diego and on April 7 at Wrigley Field), Xavier Nady (April 13 game-tying pinch homer vs. Reds, rally-sparking double on Tuesday at San Diego) and Steve Lombardozzi (4-for-5, 2 RBI on April 16 vs. Houston) have already played integral roles in victories this season.

There is also depth on the pitching staff. While we thankfully have not yet had to call upon our obvious rotation depth, it should be noted that all seven relievers have pitched important innings in close games this season. There really have been no exceptions. Winning streaks will do that and thus far our bullpen has more than held its own in contributing to our early season success.

Stephen Strasburg leads the best starting staff in baseball.

Which brings me to the starting rotation. There has been none better in baseball. And the gap is widening with seemingly every start. There really is not much to say other than Strasburg, Gonzalez, Zimmermann, Jackson and Detwiler have collectively been beyond exceptional.

The formula from my seat has been a healthy share of strikeouts, precious few walks and keeping the ball in the ballpark.

And despite this early-season dominance, Davey knows we are in this for the long haul. The five starters have combined to throw just 110.2 innings this season. That ranks 16th in MLB and does not suggest even a whiff of overuse.

One thing that I have noted about Davey is his innate ability to balance tonight’s result with “tomorrow.” That is, an understanding of where we are in the scope of a game, a series, the season, and just as importantly, where these pitchers are in terms of their careers.

I am looking forward to our series this weekend against the Dodgers, who are playing as well as they have in a few years. I never miss our trip to Dodger Stadium, which really is on any short list of the top venues in all of sports. The place is oozing with history, the backdrop is spectacular and the fans are always knowledgeable.

Tonight’s finale at Petco Park is my 16th straight game. I hope we can finish off the sweep and keep the good vibes rolling.

Let’s go CAPS! … Let’s go NATS! …

From The Desk Of Mark Lerner – Heading Home

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Hello Nationals Fans,

Is everyone counting backwards, like I am? Only three days until the April 5, 2012 Season Opener on Chicago’s north side.

But before we indulge ourselves with grandiose visions of Wrigley Field, Opening Week and of course our April 12 home opener against the Reds, I also want to mention how happy I am personally – as is my entire family – for our dear friend Stan Kasten, who along with Magic Johnson and Guggenheim Partners, agreed to purchase the Dodgers last week.

Upon getting word that this transaction was going through, I immediately called Stan, who was in New York signing the first wave of legal documents. He was elated and for good reason. Stan in Hollywood…a PERFECT match!

The Dodgers are a crown-jewel franchise with a special place historically in our game. Baseball is a better sport when the Dodgers are prominent. I am looking forward to seeing Stan – and hopefully meeting Magic – when we head west to Los Angeles to visit one of my favorite places in baseball, Dodger Stadium, starting on April 27.

The cherry blossoms in bloom can mean only one thing: it's time for Opening Day.

Now, let’s put a wrap on the ‘12 Grapefruit League season, Davey Johnson’s first camp as Manager of the Nats.

Remember, Davey is a baseball lifer whose baseball life began as a Spring Training bat boy with our Senators in the early 1950’s. He had a vision and by spring’s end, I think it is safe to say this was the most competitive camp in Nationals history. And that competition stemmed largely from the strongest crop of minor leaguers we’ve ever had.

Davey knows that everything great in this game starts in Spring Training. Sure, there were some bumps along the way, and perhaps a few more injuries than we’d like to see. Prominent players like Michael Morse, Drew Storen, Chien-Ming Wang, Adam LaRoche and Rick Ankiel have all been a little banged up.  But, the way I see it, better now than in May or June, right?

At the end of the day, a lot did go right. Easily, the best news of the spring came on Feb. 26 as the Nationals signed Ryan Zimmerman to a long-term contract extension. Ryan’s playing abilities are obvious, but he is also a true gentleman.

There is wonderful symmetry in knowing that the first draft selection (2005) in the history of the Nationals will be playing in D.C. for a long time, perhaps his entire career. There are just not enough star athletes that stay with one club, in one town, their entire careers.

The games started on March 2 with a 3-0 victory over D.C.’s own Georgetown University. Even with the loss, the young Hoyas were provided with a challenge and thrill they will never forget.

Rick Ankiel got his spring off to a great start as he hit an opposite-field homer against the Mets in his hometown of Port St. Lucie. I know it must have been gratifying for him to perform in front of family, friends and some of his former high school teachers and coaches.

Even though he will start the season in Syracuse, Corey Brown seemed to emerge from an injury-riddled 2011 season with a strong spring showing (.318, one homer, 4 RBI in 10 games). I bet he continues his good play in Syracuse.

Mark DeRosa showed everyone that his wrist was healthy, hitting .400+ for the spring. He also (jokingly) claims he set a Grapefruit League record with 10 walks in less than 50 plate appearances. I don’t know about that, but he was on base 2-3 times a game. He is going to be a real weapon for Davey.

Bryce Harper performed well on the field, but a minor injury temporarily slowed his momentum. That said, he showed all of the maturity needed to excel off the field. He managed loads of media requests and was always ready to play, the calf injury notwithstanding.

Bryce handled his option to Syracuse with true class, but at the same moment, he was charged up by Davey’s challenge to play center field. I have a feeling we will be seeing Bryce in D.C. in the not-too-distant future.

This spring, we enjoyed meeting Gio Gonzalez and watching him perform in our uniform for the first time. That curveball will be something I look forward to seeing once every five days for a long time to come. And the remainder of his repertoire was not too shabby either.

Jordan Zimmermann and Edwin Jackson will round out one of the hardest-throwing staffs in baseball. Both are quiet, both are competitors. Both are healthy and slot quite nicely into our rotation. And let’s not forget John Lannan who pitched very well this spring and Chien-Ming Wang, who was throwing so well prior to his hamstring injury. He is recovering nicely and will be another major piece for us as the season goes on.

And how about our bullpen? They picked up where they left off last season and now we have added Brad Lidge, one of the most accomplished relievers in the game today. I’d also like to note just how well Henry Rodriguez pitched. He was consistently outstanding from Day 1 of camp.

With all that said, I think the best sight of all this spring was Wilson Ramos behind the plate.  I know how excited I was in seeing him for the first time, so I can only wonder how emotionally taxing his first week of camp was. There is something about the atmosphere created by teammates in a clubhouse setting. Wilson is back where he belongs, with us and in a Nationals uniform, safe and sound.

I sense Mike Rizzo’s off-season acquisitions, Davey’s confidence, and the unusually warm temps this spring have generated a strong buzz for Nationals baseball in D.C.

A strong start in April would certainly help the equation, but I keep reminding myself that it is a long season.

Thanks for your continued support Nats fans. Let’s play ball! It is finally time.

I’ll look forward to seeing everyone all season long at beautiful and picturesque Nationals Park.

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