Archive for the ‘ Youth Baseball Academy ’ Category

Barrett, Frandsen visit MedStar Georgetown University Hospital & Nationals Youth Baseball Academy

Twitter: @Nationals | Facebook: Nationals | Instagram: @Nationals

by Kyle Mann

Washington Nationals reliever Aaron Barrett and utility man Kevin Frandsen made the most of their respective visits to D.C. for NatsFest last weekend, coming in a day early to brighten the spirits of local children.

Barrett and Frandsen started their day on Friday, Dec. 12 by visiting with patients battling life-threatening illnesses at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital at its annual Hope for Henry Foundation’s Winter Wonderland Holiday Party. They followed that up with a visit to the Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy, located in Ward 7’s Fort Dupont Park.

gingerbread nats park with barrett and frandsenDuring the hospital visit, the players, and their wives, visited patient rooms and took part in fun activities with the children, including participating in a photo station and decorating a gingerbread replica of Nationals Park — complete with Racing Presidents. The stunning detail put into the gingerbread Nationals Park illustrated the level of care Hope for Henry and MedStar Georgetown put forth in preparing the entire day for the children and their families.

Hope for Henry, a charitable organization founded by Laurie Strongin and Gingerbread nats parkAllen Goldberg in 2003 following the loss of their son Henry to Fancolni anemia, made the visit special for everyone. When going through years of treatments with Henry, they noticed how much visits, parties, and even cupcakes and pizza meant to Henry, so they decided to focus on lifting the spirits of other children suffering with life-threatening diseases and their families.

Frandsen spent the much of his time focusing on the siblings of patients during his visit.

As a child, he spent a lot of time accompanying his brother, DJ, who passed away in 2004, to the hospital. After DJ’s passing, Frandsen started ’19 for Life’ to honor his brother. For more on his foundation, visit www.19forlife.org.

Frandsen said he felt a connection with Henry’s brother, Joseph, who attended the holiday party.

“To see Henry’s brother, Joe — at 13 — put everything on and raise the money to do it all was a totally different experience,” Frandsen said. “What Joe did today was unbelievable.”

Barrett at YBA 2Later in the afternoon, Frandsen and Barrett visited the Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy. Both players felt compelled to return after visiting the Academy this past summer and coaching scholar-athletes in the Summer Academy Program.

During the visit, the players provided some hands-on baseball instruction and each took part in a Q&A session. Based on the hard-hitting questions asked of Barrett, some of the Academy’s scholar-athletes may have a future as Nationals beat writers.

The “Bear” was asked to name the entire Nationals roster (he went position by position with aplomb), if he was friends with Ian Desmond (of course), and perhaps the toughest question of all, would he rather eat a toenail or dog food (he begrudgingly answered dog food).

Frandsen at YBADespite the good-natured ribbing, Barrett once again came away impressed by the Academy and its scholar-athletes.

“It’s a great facility — certainly the nicest I’ve seen,” Barrett said. “It was fun to interact with kids and teach them some things I was taught at their age. It’s wonderful how the Academy focuses on education and nutrition as well as baseball.”

Frandsen estimated it was the fourth or fifth time he’s visited.

“It’s always enjoyable coming here,” he said. “Some of the kids remember you and you can get to know their names, which has been great. I’ve been on a lot of teams (that focus on) kids in the community, but never with one central academy like this, in this Ward where they need it.”

Barrett at YBA 1The goals of the Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy are to use baseball and softball to foster positive character development, academic achievement and improved health among at-risk Washington, D.C. youth. Frandsen said the fact that it all can happen at one facility is one of the many standout qualities of the Academy.

“There is a common goal,” Frandsen said. “It’s a spot for education, tutors, they teach teamwork, eating right and all of this is accomplished at a common location to work together to help to achieve all of these goals.”

Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy Looking for Mentors

Twitter: @Nationals | Facebook: Nationals | Instagram: @Nationals

by Kyle Mann

As the Washington Nationals Youth Baseball Academy (WNYBA) enters its second year of core programming, the organization is looking for qualified volunteers from the community to support its academic enrichment programs.

The commitment for mentors is two hours, one day per week, and it is important that mentors are able to commit each week so they can become role models for the program’s scholar-athletes. These mentors will build a rich community that exposes young scholars to new perspectives and many forms of support. Mentors, in turn, are rewarded with the experience of making a dramatic and clear impact on the lives of young people.

Those who are interested, please see below, or visit the WNYBA website to apply. Applications received by September 5 will receive priority consideration.

The WNYBA is located at 3675 Ely Place SE. Street parking is available, and a shuttle is provided from the Stadium-Armory Metro (Orange/Blue/Silver lines) at 5:30 pm.

Washington NationalsGeneral Information:
Creative programming, based on nationally acclaimed models, will help boys and girls:
• Develop a passion for and skill in the game of baseball.
• Improve English Language Arts, Science and Mathematics outcomes.
• Be physically active, learn about nutrition and how to cook healthy foods.
• Grow through the years with an organization committed to their success.

Teaching Mentors Commitment:
What
: Teach a small group of third, fourth, or fifth graders in a core academic subject: Math (STEM), English Language Arts, or BrainFood (only available Thursdays) using provided baseball-themed lessons.
When: One night per week: (Tuesdays: 6:00 – 7:45 pm; Wednesdays: 6:00 – 7:45 pm; Thursdays: 4:00- 6:00 pm or 6:00 – 7:45 pm (as a Brain Food Assistant!)) plus 1 hour of lesson preparation per week.

Qualifications:
Mentors do not need to have any prior teaching experience to be a mentor and the curriculum is pre-developed and highly-structured. All we ask of you is your time and your energy. You will be a role model to your scholars, and you will play an important part in their lives as you develop relationships with them.

Requirements:
• Ability to make an academic year long commitment, September to May.
• Ability to lead engaging activities and lessons.
• Complete an interview, background check process, and TB Test.
• Flexibility and willingness to learn and attend all required trainings.

The following qualities are preferred but not required:
• Experience working with youth.
• Experience with curriculum and instruction.
• A working knowledge of the rules of baseball/softball.

 

Nationals players make final day of Summer Academy at YBA a memorable one

Twitter: @Nationals | Facebook: Nationals | Instagram: @Nationals

 Washington Nationals

by Kyle Mann

On the final day of its Summer Academy Program, the scholar-athletes at the Washington Nationals’ Youth Baseball Academy had a few special visitors.

Aaron Barrett, Ian Desmond, Kevin Frandsen, Scott Hairston and Adam LaRoche visited the YBA on Friday morning, and though the experience was surely one the nearly-100 scholar-athletes participating would never forget, the Nationals players may have been the ones most impacted.

“It’s been a blast to be here,” LaRoche said of the Academy, a place he referred to as ‘The Disneyland of Baseball.’ “It was two hours of nothing but fun and smiles.”

The schedule for the day included games played simultaneously on the Academy’s three fields, one overseen by Hairston and his two sons, Dallas and Landon, one run by LaRoche and his daughter, Montana, and another by Barrett and Frandsen.

Desmond, who hosts a group of 20 Academy scholar-athletes at Nationals Park every month during the season as part of his Ian’s Academy All-Stars program, is also a Youth Baseball Academy Board Member. Serving in a role best described as roving fun instructor, he rotated between fields, alternating teaching proper footwork around the second base bag and giving one-on-one pep talks to future stars.

“All we can do is try to make an impact,” Desmond said. “It’s good for the kids, the parents, it’s all positive.”

While the constant chants supporting every batter emphasized how much fun this day was for the kids, Summer Academy coach Travaughn Kinney reminded his team about the importance of striving to be your best.

“Focus on having fun, but we love to win,” he told his team as they took the field.

Kinney, a two-sport college athlete from D.C., discussed the importance of baseball for children as part of their development.

“Baseball teaches patience, and kids from (this area) need that,” he said. “Baseball truly requires a team, and that’s my favorite part about the game.”

The Youth Baseball Academy is about a lot more than baseball, and the Summer Academy program is no exception. An integral part of the YBA’s year-round youth development program, the Summer Academy provides a safe, fun, and active learning environment that furthers its mission to use baseball and softball as vehicles to develop literacy and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) skills. The program also teaches scholar-athletes how to lead healthy lifestyles through fitness, proper nutrition and cooking lessons in a safe, nurturing environment.

The scholar-athletes partaking in the Summer Academy included rising fourth and fifth graders who participated in the Academy’s inaugural After-School Program, and rising third graders who started with the first Summer Academy.

In future years, Academy attendees will matriculate through the eighth grade while a class of rising third graders is added. To supplement learning at the Academy, the scholar-athletes took part in weekly experiential-learning field trips, including to the United States Botanic Gardens, the Smithsonian’s Discovery Theater and the National Zoo.

But playing baseball with their favorite Nationals on the program’s final day may have offered the biggest highlight.

Here’s a photo gallery from the day:

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 565 other followers